Diego Pellicer Worldwide, Inc. Executes Letter Of Intent To Purchase Denver Cannabis Retail Operation

Diego Pellicer Worldwide, Inc. Executes Letter Of Intent To Purchase Denver Cannabis Retail Operation

Latest strategic move is consistent with Diego Pellicer’s commitment to evolve the company’s business model

Diego Pellicer Worldwide, Inc.

Sep 04, 2019, 09:06 ET

DENVER, Sept. 4, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Diego Pellicer Worldwide, Inc. (OTCQB: DPWW), the premium marijuana brand and development company, today announced that it has executed a letter of intent to purchase a cannabis retail store in Denver. The 3,300 square-foot retail location is projected to have gross sales exceeding $8.5 million in 2019 and $9.5 million in gross sales in 2020.

“This is a critical milestone for Diego Pellicer Worldwide. The execution of the LOI in Colorado is the first step in the evolution of our business model. We are delivering on our commitment to become a vertically integrated premium cannabis company. We look forward to working with the Colorado Marijuana Enforcement Division to garner approval for Diego Pellicer Worldwide to become a fully licensed cannabis company, that includes direct ownership in cannabis operations,” said Ron Throgmartin, chief executive officer, Diego Pellicer Worldwide, Inc. “For Diego Pellicer Worldwide to continue to grow, we need to pursue these new avenues of ownership as well as branded cannabis products that will be available at company stores and beyond its branded retail locations.”

The non-binding letter of intent is subject to compliance with the Colorado Marijuana Enforcement Division and House Bill 19-1090. The letter of intent will be followed by a contract once rulemaking for Colorado House Bill 19-1090 has concluded and the Marijuana Enforcement Division has issued regulations guiding the process for public companies and out-of-state investors to apply for cannabis licensing ownership. The completed regulations and application process are expected in November 2019 after the final public comment hearing is held on Oct. 8.

The Premium Diego Pellicer Cannabis Experience
Whether a new customer or a cannabis connoisseur, Diego Pellicer elevates the cannabis shopping experience, ensuring that no matter the location, customers can count on Diego Pellicer to deliver the same exceptional customer service, premium cannabis and competitive pricing. Diego Pellicer branded stores feature the finest products, concierge quality service in an approachable, world-class environment.

About Diego Pellicer Worldwide, Inc. (OTCQB: DPWW)
Diego Pellicer Worldwide, Inc. is the premium marijuana brand, retail and management company. In addition to its branded locations in Colorado, the company actively seeks to develop and manage high-end, turnkey cannabis retail stores. When federally legal, DPWW is positioned to become a national, vertically integrated cannabis company. To learn more about how to become a branded Diego Pellicer retailer, cultivator or investor visit www.Diego-Pellicer.com.

Safe Harbor Statement 
Certain statements contained in this press release may be construed as “forward-looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “Act”). The words “estimate,” “project,” “intends,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “believes” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements are made based on management’s beliefs, as well as assumptions made by, and information currently available to, management pursuant to the “safe-harbor” provisions of the Act. These statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those projected on the basis of these statements. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date made. The Company also undertakes no obligation to disclose any revision to these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date made or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

CONTACTS:

Suzanne Herrick, Fedoruk & Associates, Inc., 612-247-3079, suzanne@fedorukinc.com

Nello Gonfiantini, Diego Pellicer Worldwide, Inc., 775-690-2188, nello@diego-pellicer.com

SOURCE Diego Pellicer Worldwide, Inc.

Researchers use mobile app to measure how commercially available cannabis products affect pain intensity — ScienceDaily


Using the largest database of real-time recordings of the effects of common and commercially available cannabis products in the United States (U.S.), researchers at The University of New Mexico (UNM) found strong evidence that cannabis can significantly alleviate pain, with the average user experiencing a three-point drop in pain suffering on a 0-10 point scale immediately following cannabis consumption.

With a mounting opioid epidemic at full force and relatively few alternative pain medications available to the general public, scientists found conclusive support that cannabis is very effective at reducing pain caused by different types of health conditions, with relatively minimal negative side effects.

Chronic pain afflicts more than 20 percent of adults and is the most financially burdensome health condition that the U.S faces; exceeding, for example, the combined costs of treating heart disease and cancer.

“Our country has been flooded with an over-prescription of opioids medications, which then often leads to non-prescription opioid and heroin use for many people. This man-made disaster is killing our families and friends, regardless of socio-economic status, skin tone, and other superficial human differences” said Jacob Miguel Vigil, one of the lead investigators of the study, titled “The Effectiveness of Self-Directed Medical Cannabis Treatment for Pain,” published in the journal Complementary Therapies in Medicine.

Vigil explains, “Cannabis offers the average patient an effective alternative to using opioids for general use in the treatment of pain with very minimal negative side effects for most people.”

The researchers relied on information collected with Releaf App, a mobile software program developed by co-authors Franco Brockelman, Keenan Keeling and Branden Hall. The app. enables cannabis users to monitor the real-time effects of the breadth of available cannabis-based products, which are always variable, of course, given the complexity of the Cannabis plant from which these products are obtained.

Since its release in 2016, the commercially developed Releaf App has been the only publicly available, incentive-free app for educating patients on how different types of products (e.g., flower or concentrate), combustion methods, cannabis subspecies (Indica, Sativa, and hybrid), and major cannabinoid contents (THC and CBD) affect their symptom severity levels, providing the user invaluable feedback on their health status, medication choices, and the clinical outcomes of those choices as measured by symptom relief and side effects.

Scientifically, software like the Releaf App enables researchers to overcome the inherent limitations of government-funded clinical trials on the real-time effects of Cannabis, which are rare in general, but also often limited by onerous federal regulations, including its Schedule I status (no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential) and the mandate that investigators use the notoriously poor quality and low potency cannabis products supplied by the National Institute of Drug Abuse.

“Even just rescheduling cannabis just from Schedule I to Schedule II, i.e., classifying it with fentanyl, oxycodone, and cocaine rather than heroin and ecstasy, could dramatically improve our ability to conduct research and only would require that the DEA recognizes that accepted medical uses for cannabis exist, as clearly evidenced by our results and the flourishing medical cannabis programs in the majority of U.S. states,” pointed out co-author Sarah Stith.

Among the study’s findings the greatest analgesic responses were reported by people that used whole dried cannabis flower, or ‘buds,’ and particularly cannabis with relatively high levels of tetrahydrocannabinol, otherwise known as THC. The more recently popularized cannabinoid, cannabidiol or CBD, in contrast, showed little association with the momentary changes in pain intensity, based on the massive database explored in the study.

“Cannabis likely has numerous constituents that possess analgesic properties beyond THC, including terpenes and flavonoids, which likely act synergistically for people that use whole dried cannabis flower,” said Vigil, “Our results confirm that cannabis use is a relatively safe and effective medication for alleviating pain, and that is the most important message to learn from our results. It can only benefit the public for people to be able to responsibly weigh the true risks and benefits of their pain medication choices, and when given this opportunity, I’ve seen numerous chronic pain patients substitute away from opioid use, among many other classes of medications, in favor of medical cannabis.”

“Perhaps the most surprising result is just how widespread relief was with symptom relief reported in about 95 percent of cannabis administration sessions and across a wide variety of different types of pain,” added lead author of the study, Xiaoxue Li.

The authors do caution that cannabis use does carry the risks of addiction and short-term impairments in cognitive and behavioral functioning, and may not be effective for everyone. However, there are multiple mechanisms by which cannabis alleviates pain suffering. In addition to its anti-inflammatory properties, cannabis activates receptors that are colocalized with opioid receptors in the brain. “Cannabis with high THC also causes mood elevation and adjusts attentional demands, likely distracting patients from the aversive sensations that people refer to “pain,” explains Vigil.

“When compared to the negative health risks associated with opioid use, which currently takes the lives of over 115 Americans a day, cannabis may be an obvious value to patients. Chronic opioid use is associated with poorer quality of life, social isolation, lower immune functioning and early morbidity. In contrast, my own ongoing research increasingly suggests that cannabis use is associated with a reversal of each of these potential outcomes,” said Vigil



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Tuesday, August 20, 2019 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News


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Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, August 20, 2019 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Credit Unions Can Bank Hemp Businesses, Federal Agency Announces (Marijuana Moment)

// Oregon Has Way Too Much Legal Weed. This Is Where It’s Going (Vice)

// Marijuana Taxes Differ In Legalized States, Complicating Projections (Marijuana Moment)


Today’s headlines are brought to you by our friends over at Eaze.com, California’s top one stop website for legal marijuana delivery. If you live in the golden state, swing over to Eaze.com to see if they are active in your area. With deliveries taking place in less than an hour, it’s never been easier to get legal California marijuana delivery. And of course, if you don’t live where Eaze delivers, you can still benefit from all the useful bits of industry insight and analysis they’ve developed using their properly aggregate and anonymized sales data stream.


// ‘The system is swamped.’ Canada can’t keep up with requests to study cannabis (Science Magazine)

// Columbia begins shipping CBD to Switzerland (Grizzle)

// Medicine Man Technologies Continues to Execute on Colorado Roll-Up Strategy with Announcement of $17.25 Million Pending Acquisition (New Cannabis Ventures)

// Canadian cannabis investors still waiting for a breakout company to emerge (Growth Op)

// Deschutes County imposes marijuana moratorium (Bend Bulletin)

// Louisiana medical cannabis supplies adequate, state says (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Bernie Sanders Calls For Legalization Of Marijuana And Safe Injection Sites (Marijuana Moment)


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Amount rivals what Americans spend on alcohol — ScienceDaily


Spending on cannabis, cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine by Americans reached nearly $150 billion in 2016, with a large proportion of spending coming from the small share of people who use drugs on a daily or near-daily basis, according to a new RAND Corporation report.

Researchers estimate that from 2006 to 2016, the total amount of money spent by Americans on these four drugs fluctuated between $120 billion and $145 billion each year. By contrast, a different analysis finds that spending on alcohol in the U.S. was estimated to be $158 billion in 2017.

Total spending on cannabis, from both illegal and state-licensed sources, increased by approximately 50 percent from 2006 to 2016, from $34 billion to $52 billion. The market for cannabis is roughly the size of the cocaine and methamphetamine markets combined, and the size of the retail heroin market is now closer to the size of the marijuana market than it is to the other drugs, according to the analysis.

“To better understand changes in drug use outcomes and the effects of policies, policymakers need to know what is happening in markets for these substances,” said Greg Midgette, the study’s lead author, an assistant professor at University of Maryland and an adjunct policy researcher at RAND, a nonprofit research organization. “But it is challenging to generate these estimates, and given that critical data sources have been eliminated, it will likely be harder to generate these figures in the future.”

In addition to estimating expenditures on cannabis, cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine, researchers from RAND used a variety of sources of information about drug use and drug prices to also estimate the number of people who use these substances and how much they consume.

The report shows that after falling precipitously from 2006 to 2010, consumption of cocaine continued to fall slowly through 2015, then increased in 2016. Results suggest there were 2.4 million individuals who used cocaine on four more or days in the past month in 2015 and 2016. Results also suggest that consumption grew in 2016 among a stable number of users as the price per pure gram declined.

Consumption of heroin increased approximately 10 percent per year between 2010 and 2016, according to the analysis. Whereas most heroin consumed in the United States comes from poppies grown in Mexico, the introduction of synthetic opioids like fentanyl into heroin markets has increased the risk of using heroin and complicated market analyses.

There was a steady increase in the amount of heroin seized within the United States and at the southwest border from 2007 through 2016. Changes in the composition of heroin users, potentially involving increased use among individuals without criminal histories, have increased the uncertainty underlying these estimates.

From 2010 to 2016, the number of individuals who used cannabis in the past month increased nearly 30 percent, from 25 million to 32 million. Changes in the potency of marijuana and the proliferation of nonflower products such as oils and waxes have made weight-based consumption estimates obsolete and forced a change in how researchers calculate expenditures.

Researchers say their estimates about methamphetamine use are subject to the greatest uncertainty because national data sets do a particularly poor job of capturing its use.

The federal government discontinued a critical data collection effort in 2003, the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring, or ADAM, right before methamphetamine use was believed to be at its first peak during 2004 to 2006.

ADAM not only collected detailed information about drug market transactions from arrestees, it also included a voluntary urine screen that could only be used for research purposes. A limited version of ADAM was brought back in 2007 and then eliminated after 2013, right when methamphetamine consumption was believed to be picking back up.

“While there is considerable uncertainty surrounding national methamphetamine estimates, multiple indicators suggest methamphetamine use has exceeded its previous peak around 2005,” said Beau Kilmer, co-author of the report and director of the RAND Drug Policy Research Center. “While there is much more we can do reduce opioid use disorders and poisonings involving synthetic opioids, we cannot ignore the growing problems associated with methamphetamine use.”

The RAND researchers note that one important step to better address use of methamphetamine and understand all drug markets would be to fund again some version of the ADAM program that covers urban and rural areas.

Support for the study was provided by the Office of Research and Data Analysis within the federal Office of National Drug Control Policy.



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Cannabis-related poison control calls for Massachusetts kids doubled after medical pot legalized — ScienceDaily


After medical marijuana became legal in Massachusetts, cannabis-related poison control calls involving the commonwealth’s children and teenagers doubled, according to a public health investigation led by University of Massachusetts Amherst injury prevention researcher Jennifer Whitehill.

The increase in calls to the Regional Center for Poison Control and Prevention at Boston Children’s Hospital occurred despite legislative mandates for childproof packaging and warning labels, and before the recreational use of marijuana was legalized for adults.

“As states across the country enact more permissive marijuana policies, we need to do more to promote safe storage in households with children,” says Whitehill, assistant professor of health promotion and policy and lead author of the research published in JAMA Network Open.

Whitehill and former UMass Amherst graduate student Calla Harrington analyzed data from the poison control center in collaboration with staff from the center, including medical director Dr. Michele Burns and clinical fellow Dr. Michael Chary. The research team reviewed the center’s data from 2009 through 2016 — four years before and four years after medical marijuana was legalized in Massachusetts.

During the study period, the poison control center received 218 calls from Massachusetts involving cannabis exposure in children and teens, from infancy to age 19, including 98 single-substance calls and 120 polysubstance calls. Those calls represented 0.15 percent of all poison control calls during that time period for that age group.

“While we’re pleased to see that the incidence is relatively low, we feel these cases are preventable, and the issue needs to be on the radar of policymakers and parents, particularly now that dispensaries are open for adult-use sales,” Whitehill says.

Some highlights of the findings:

  • The incidence of calls for single-substance cannabis exposure increased 140 percent during the study period — from 0.4 per 100,000 population before medical marijuana was legalized to 1.1 per 100,000 population after legalization.
  • Nearly 80 percent of the calls to the poison control center came from healthcare facilities, and, in terms of medical outcomes, most of the exposures resulted in moderate and minor effects. Four cases with major effects and no deaths were reported.
  • A little more than a quarter of the cases were reported as unintentional, with 19.4 percent of calls involving children from infancy through age 4.
  • Calls involving edible cannabis products increased for most age groups, including ages 15-19. Because other research has found that the proportion of teens using marijuana is remaining about the same even as marijuana laws are loosening, this finding suggests that teenagers may be caught off guard by the potentially potent effects of edibles and concentrated extracts, Whitehill says.

The paper concludes, “This study suggests that states liberalizing marijuana policies should consider strengthening regulations to prevent unintentional exposure among young children and enhancing efforts to prevent use by teenagers, with particular attention to edible cannabis products and concentrated extracts.”

Whitehill says the next step is to study the impact of marijuana’s legalization for adult use, which went into effect in late 2016. Two years later, in November 2018, marijuana retail stores began opening.

“Given what we’ve seen here,” Whitehill says, “I would expect the calls to the poison control center to increase even more.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.



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Friday, August 16, 2019 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News


A cured and trimmed marijuana bud sits on a window sill in the sun.

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Friday, August 16, 2019 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// California now has the biggest legal marijuana market in the world. Its black market is even bigger (LA Times)

// Illegal pot still a source for 4 in 10 cannabis users, Stats Can survey shows (CTV News)

// Maryland’s Highest Court Rules Pot Smell Not Enough To Search Person (CBS Baltimore)


Today’s headlines are brought to you by our friends over at McCabe Law LLC of Portland Maine, which is partnering with the Climate Resources Group to throw a series of cannabis seminars starting Tuesday, August 20th, and running every 20th of the month through October. Attendees will get the straight scoop on the best way to get started in Maine’s legal cannabis industry. Find out more and purchase your own ticket at https://www.mccabelawllc.com/seminars.html.


// Short’s Brewing will make marijuana beverages, candy in partnership agreement (Michigan Live)

// High Times Partners With Clio To Launch Cannabis Marketing Awards (Times of CBD)

// Five Federal Agencies Respond To Presidential Candidate’s Hemp Banking Letter (Marijuana Moment)

// Federal Health Agency Releases List Of Marijuana Research Priorities (Marijuana Moment)

// New Mexico gov opposes opening medical cannabis market to nonresidents (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Outside Lands Music Festival Raked in $1 Million in Legal Weed Sales (Merry Jane)

// UFC star Nate Diaz lights up joint during open workout (NY Post)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: Weed Porn Daily/Flickr



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Thursday, August 15, 2019 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News


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Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, August 15, 2019 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Canopy Growth, world’s largest pot company, lost $1 billion in three months (Market Watch)

// Your marijuana delivery is here – now smile for the body cam (Boston Globe)

// Mexico’s top court demands regulation on medical marijuana after long delays (Reuters)


Today’s headlines are brought to you by our friends over at McCabe Law LLC of Portland Maine, which is partnering with the Climate Resources Group to throw a series of cannabis seminars starting Tuesday, August 20th, and running every 20th of the month through October. Attendees will get the straight scoop on the best way to get started in Maine’s legal cannabis industry. Find out more and purchase your own ticket at https://www.mccabelawllc.com/seminars.html.


// UC Davis Will Start Doing Government-Sanctioned Cannabis Research (Merry Jane)

// New Mexico governor’s commission eyeing adult-use cannabis legalization (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Wholesale marijuana prices on upswing in more mature recreational markets, reports indicate (Marijuana Business Daily)

// In one month, 3,000 Pennsylvanians with anxiety certified for medical marijuana (Pennsylvania Capital-Star)

// Damaging hailstorm hits Oregon hemp farms, causes potentially millions in losses (Hemp Industry Daily)

// No, Drug-Sniffing Dogs Can’t Distinguish Between Marijuana And Hemp (Fresh Toast)

// Former Congressman Touts His Decades-Old Marijuana Bill At State Regulatory Meeting (Marijuana Moment)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: Martin Abegglen/Flickr



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Marijuana may boost risky effects of drinking alcohol — ScienceDaily


As the legalization of medical marijuana and marijuana use are both on the rise in the United States, people are not necessarily using alcohol less and may be unaware of the risks of combining alcohol and marijuana, according to researchers.

A new study from Penn State found that compared to people who only drank alcohol, those who used alcohol and marijuana simultaneously were more likely to drink heavier and more often. They were also more likely to experience alcohol-related problems — like impulsive actions they later regretted.

“The results suggest that individuals who simultaneously use alcohol and marijuana are at a disproportionately higher risk for heavy, frequent, and problematic substance use,” said Ashley Linden-Carmichael, assistant research professor at the Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center at Penn State.

The researchers said the findings — recently published in the journal Substance Use and Misuse — also suggest that prevention and intervention programs should take into account not just alcohol, but also if people are using additional substances, as well.

“Right now, a lot of campus programs focus on whether students are drinking, and while sometimes they are asked about other substances, it’s not necessarily whether they’re using these substances simultaneously,” Linden-Carmichael said. “I think we do need to be asking about whether they’re drinking in combination with other drugs and educating students about how that exacerbates their risk.”

According to the researchers, marijuana use is at an all-time high among young adults in the U.S., possibly leading to people using marijuana and alcohol simultaneously.

“The problem with simultaneous use is that it can affect people cognitively and perceptually, and also have an impact on motor impairment,” Linden-Carmichael said. “There is a burgeoning area of research that is examining why people are using marijuana and alcohol together and what those effects are.”

In the study, Linden-Carmichael said she and the other researchers were interested in learning more about how people use marijuana and alcohol together. They also wanted to explore whether personality traits — like the tendency to pursue new and exciting experiences, or “sensation seeking” — were associated with higher odds of using alcohol and marijuana at the same time.

The researchers recruited 1,017 participants from 49 states in the U.S. between the ages of 18 and 25 for the study. The participants provided information about how often they used alcohol, marijuana and the two substances simultaneously. They also filled out questionnaires that measured their experiences with alcohol-related problems, whether they had a sensation-seeking personality, and how they perceived the drinking habits of their friends.

Linden-Carmichael said that across the board, individuals who used alcohol and marijuana simultaneously were at a greater risk than individuals using alcohol alone.

“Even after controlling for the number of drinks a person typically consumed, people who used alcohol and marijuana at the same time were at a greater risk for problems like blacking out, getting in an argument, or other concerns,” Linden-Carmichael said. “Additionally, 70 percent of those who engaged in simultaneous use reported using at least weekly.”

The researchers found that among people who used alcohol and marijuana simultaneously, those who used more frequently were more likely to drink more alcohol, more often, and for longer periods of time. They were also associated with using more marijuana more often.

Additionally, they found that people who used alcohol and marijuana together were more likely to have higher levels of sensation-seeking characteristics and think their friends were drinking larger amounts of alcohol.

Story Source:

Materials provided by Penn State. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.



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Tuesday, August 13, 2019 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News


A budding and growing marijuana plant is brightly lit under indoor lights.

Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Tuesday, August 13, 2019 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// CannTrust sinks as Health Canada finds second facility non-compliant (BNN Bloomberg)

// Key Congressional Chairman Sends Marijuana Email To NORML Activists (Forbes)

// Legal Cannabis Mellowed Outside Lands Megafestival (Leafly)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 150,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// Pritzker signs two bills expanding medical cannabis program (25 News NBC)

// New Mexico closer to capping medical marijuana cultivation (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Scent of unburnt marijuana exclusively is not grounds to search warehouse, SJC rules (Boston Globe)

// Top Senate Democrat Calls On Federal Regulators To Clarify Hemp Banking Rules (Marijuana Moment)

// Health Canada Isn’t Too Worried About Canadian Producers on Snapchat (Leafly)

// First recreational marijuana store opens off Massachusetts mainland (Marijuana Business Daily)

// How the Dutch Spread Cannabis Across the World (Leafly)


Check out our other projects:
Marijuana Today— Our flagship title, a weekly podcast examining the world of marijuana business and activism with some of the smartest people in the industry and movement.
Marijuana Media Connect— A service that connects industry insiders in the legal marijuana industry with journalists, bloggers, and writers in need of expert sources for their stories.

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Photo: Claudio Toledo/Flickr



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