Thursday, June 13, 2019 Headlines | Marijuana Today Daily News


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Marijuana Today Daily Headlines
Thursday, June 13, 2019 | Curated by host Shea Gunther

// Colorado Weed Revenue Surpasses $1 Billion (Rolling Stone)

// In Landmark Ruling, Cali Court Says It’s Legal for Prisoners to Possess Cannabis (Merry Jane)

// Federal agents return $250K seized from licensed CA marijuana distributor (Marijuana Business Daily)


These headlines are brought to you by Curaleaf, one of the leading vertically-integrated cannabis operators in the U.S. With legal medical marijuana dispensaries, cultivation sites, and processing facilities all over the United States, Curaleaf has served more than 100,000 medical cannabis patients and looks forward to helping many more long into the future. Swing over to Curaleaf.com to learn more about this very cool company!


// U.S. Postal Services Unveils New Policy On Mailing Hemp-Derived CBD Products (Marijuana Moment)

// Quebec’s government-run cannabis stores lose CA$5 million (Marijuana Business Daily)

// Canadian Pot Company Introduces So-Called ‘Pure Cannabis Cigarettes’ (Merry Jane)

// King Soopers In Colorado To Soon Sell CBD Products (CBS Denver)

// Poll Reveals Top Reasons People Support Or Oppose Marijuana Legalization (Marijuana Moment)

// Oregon Is About to OK Cannabis Exports. What’s Next? (Leafly)

// California National Guard not yet redeployed to combat illegal marijuana farms (Marijuana Business Daily)


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Individual differences in brain systems for habitual behavior distinguish heavy cannabis users who develop an addiction — ScienceDaily


A shift from brain systems controlling reward-driven use to habit-driven use differentiates heavy cannabis users who are addicted to the drug from users who aren’t, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier. The findings help explain how the brain becomes dependent on cannabis, and why not all cannabis users develop an addiction, even with long-term regular use.

In the study, researchers at the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China and University of Bonn, Germany, used brain imaging to monitor neural activity when cannabis users viewed images associated with cannabis use, referred to as drug cues. Although all of the cannabis users in the study reported heavy use, only some were dependent on the drug. Both dependent and non-dependent cannabis users had exaggerated responses in a brain region that processes reward — the ventral striatum — compared with people who didn’t use cannabis. Interestingly, the dependent users also had larger responses in a brain region that forms habits — the dorsal striatum.

“The present findings reflect that heavy cannabis use is promoted by changes in the brain’s reward system — however, these changes alone may not fully explain addictive use. Addictive use may rather be driven by changes in brain systems that promote habitual — automatic — use, which also may explain the fact that addicts continue use despite a lack of experiencing rewarding effects of the drug. As such, their behavior has become under the control of the drug cues, rather than the actual reward expectation,” said lead author Benjamin Becker, PhD.

Dependent users also had increased responses in other regions throughout the brain, including regions that attribute importance to things, for example, drug cues. This suggests that the development of cannabis addiction incorporates additional brain regions that may strengthen a person’s desire to seek the drug.

“Cannabis is now legal for medical and recreational use in many parts of the United States and the health impacts of this development are still being understood,” said Cameron Carter, MD, Editor of Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. “These findings are important insights that can help us better understand why some individuals might be more likely to become addicted to cannabis,” he added.

Differentiating the unique brain circuits behind dependent cannabis use could also be useful for understanding how to combat the problem of cannabis addiction. “The identification of the dorsal striatum and habitual behavior as a driver of addiction may allow the development of more specific treatment approaches to increase treatment success,” said first author Xinqi Zhou.

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Materials provided by Elsevier. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.



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